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Dussehra & Mysore

The royal city of Mysore and Navaratri have for long had a close connection.

1:05:52
RJ: Shruthi

Dussehra & Mysore

The royal city of Mysore and Navaratri have for long had a close connection.

The city of Mysore conjures up images of lofty palaces, Goddess Chamundeswari, the Jamboo Savari, and the Dussehra procession in which the focus is the Golden Howdah carrying the idol of the guardian Goddess of Mysore, Chamundi. Though the temple with the main deity is located atop the 3,500-foot high hillock, the Goddess’ utsava idol comes down and enters the city to go on a grand procession along the prominent streets of Mysore. The older tradition, however, was of the Wodeyar king who would be seated on the beautifully decorated Ambaari Aane, or the elephant seat, on the concluding day of Dussehra, ie, Vijayadashami. Though one may be familiar with the tale of Chamundi slaying Mahisha on the hill, the mythological association that included the worship of Shakti cannot be missed here. Such was the belief in this Goddess that members of the Mysore Royal family were ardent devotees and great patrons of the temple. That brings us to another facet of the Goddess’ glory put to verse in Carnatic ragas by Harikesanallur Muthiah Bhagavatar. Muthiah Bhagavatar, as Nalwadi Krishnaraja Wodeyar's court musician, had been asked by the king himself to take up the 108 Chamundeshwari Ashtottara Shatha Archana Namas to pen the kritis. The composer employed 108 ragas for the work, bringing in rare scales as Pashupathipriya, Valachi and Gouda Malhar. Here, we bring you a few from the series, in addition to a few others composed by the Mysore musician-composers, Jayachamaraja Wodeyar and Mysore Vasudevacharya.

Songs in this Program